Adding Gold to Our Rainbow

Archive for the category “craft”

Knitted things

A big welcome to those who ventured over here from the link in the Hill End Gathering Group newsletter.
Most of these knitted items are going up in our Etsy shop if you would rather buy through there. Otherwise you can comment here (if you can manage Bloggers CAPTCHA settings) or email me at wallflowerarts@gmail.com.
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Are you cold? Or want to stock up for when it’s cold? Or buy things for people who live where it gets cold? Here are some knitted things. Most will eventually go up on Etsy but if you want to save me the effort and fees you can get it cheaper at market price.

All of these are 100% wool except two of the shawls and a scarf. Most are hand wash only. If you want one of these but in a different colour or different material, or a pair of mitts that are shorter or longer we can do that too. Just ask.

Can’t afford or aren’t interested in buying knitted things? You can still look at the awesome stuff we’ve made.

We also take commissions for anything knitted, crochet, needle felted or embroidered and I’ll do art commissions.

We have other hats (a few more kids ones etc) and embroideries and some needle felting at our Etsy Shop


* Lumikukka pattern by Marja Airaksinen. Knit in cream (Aran) Rustic wool from Bendigo Woollen Mills $40. Adult size.

* Aeonium pattern by Woollywormhead. Knit in cream (Aran) Rustic wool from Bendigo Woollen Mills $40. Adult size.

* Welldigger pattern by Polly Hammond. Knit in grey Rustic wool from Bendigo Woollen Mills $25. Adult size. This is knit in   stitch and is really squishy and thick. The rolled brim allows you to pull it down deeper on your head if you want. It covers my ears. We’re hoping to sort out a pair of mitts to match, using the same stitch. It’s grey, not blue. The colour is like the first two photos.

* Brambles pattern by Amanda Muscha. Knit in yellow Rustic wool from Bendigo Woollen Mills. It’s a pale yellow but more yellow than this is showing on my monitor. I’ll try and get a better shot. $30. Adult size. This is a slightly slouchy beanie. If you wanted it could be blocked as a beret or left as a beanie. (The ravelry link shows it as a beret) The bottom picture is just me trying to show the top while holding the hat and the camera. On your head it wouldn’t scrunch up so much.

* The bubble hat pattern by . Knit in cream Rustic wool from Bendigo Woollen Mills $25 . Adult size. Fold the brim or pull it down depending on how deep you like your beanies.

* Corby pattern by Woollywormhead. Knit in cream, blue, black, purple and yellow Rustic wool from Bendigo Woollen Mills $35. Adult size.

* Weekender pattern by Woollywormhead. Knit in blue Rustic wool from Bendigo Woollen Mills $40. Adult size.

* The long beanie pattern by Woollywormhead. Knit in red, blue and charcoal Rustic wool from Bendigo Woollen Mills $25. Adult size.


* Strong Heart pattern by Wei S. Leong. Knit in red tweed (blue, purple, red mix) More the colour of the second picture. Rustic wool from Bendigo Woollen Mills $40. Adult female size with a fair bit of stretch. These are really long in both the arm and the hand and use a lot of wool, hence the price. If you wanted a pair with the same pattern but shorter, we can do that too.

* Alderman pattern by Victoria Magnus. Knit in aqua Rustic wool from Bendigo Woollen Mills $30. Adult female size. These don’t have as much stretch but should still fit most hands. These are shorter but quite thick.

* Cold Turkey pattern by Veronica O’Neil. Knit in aqua Rustic wool from Bendigo Woollen Mills $30. Adult size. These are really flexible. I have tiny wrists and big forearms and these fit but Ruth doesn’t have either of those and they fit her too.

* Annabella pattern by Anna Aponte. Knit in grey Rustic wool from Bendigo Woollen Mills $40. Adult size. These are fairly flexible due to the ribbing on the underside. I love the pattern. If you have really skinny forearms you may need a different size but this should fit most sizes. These can also be knit shorter.


* Branching Out pattern by Susan Lawrence. Knit in green Rustic wool from Bendigo Woollen Mills $40. This is a short scarf/cowl. Long enough to fit round your neck and tie in a knot or be pinned but wont hang down far. It’s about 40 inches long an 14 wide.

* Sparkle and rose pattern by Me. Knit in sparkly soft black acrylic with needle felted wool roses. It really doesn’t photograph well but it has a subtle silver sparkle through it. $35. Long and flexible enough to be tied anyway you like. It’s light and lacy with ruffles on the ends. One side has a needle felted wool rose. I can make more of these but the rose is going to be different each time as it’s freehand. I also have another of the scarves without the roses for $15. It’s around 60 inches long but it depends on how wide you pull it.


* The common bean pattern by Caitlin Ffrench. Knit in blue (Delta) Rustic wool from Bendigo Woollen Mills $45. Adult size short shawllete.

* Miami Vice pattern by threebagsfulled. Knit in bright rainbow acrylic yarn $50. Adult size. Comes down to just below your shoulder blades at the back. I can get photos.

* Age of Brass and Steam pattern by Orange Flower Yarn . Knit in  coppers and browns acrylic yarn $40. Adult size kerchief. Needs blocking or ironing to stop the bottom edge curling. We will do this. The colours on this are hard to photograph. It’s very Autumn colours.

* Robin pattern by Lee Meredith. Knit in light blue, green, red, yellow and purple Rustic wool from Bendigo Woollen Mills $180. Massive. This is an asymetrical garter stitch shawl. We will block it to even out the decreases etc but it wont get a lot bigger (as lace does when it’s blocked). This is quite a lot of wool, hence the price. It’s a warm and practical garment though. It wont catch like delicate lace shawls do. You can secure it with a shawl pin or a bobby pin.


Art, my connection to where I live, the dissonance between that and my cultural heritage.

Widdershins – an exhibition of Moorland Mythic Art I so, so want to go to this gorgeous exhibition in Devon. Artist involved include Alan Lee and Brian Froud. So much gorgeous art that makes me cry. Oh god I wish I could see it in person.

“Dartmoor’s landscape is steeped in magic and mystery and it is home to many artists whose work is inspired by mythic themes. Widdershins showcases the work of those who live on Dartmoor (or have local connections) Widdershins explores local legends, world myth, folklore and faery tales in diverse, surprising ways… and although it all starts ‘Once Upon a Time’, it is definitely not for children only.”

This is the sort of stuff I’d love to draw and sculpt and bring in to my work but I am so far removed from the landscape that is linked with British Folk Law.
I feel a real connection with the land out here but the myths and legends out here are either still set in European landscapes or they are Aboriginal law and to create with those is appropriation.

How do I work with Myth, Legend and the spirit of the land I live in without being disrespectful to the people that were here long before? How do I work with my cultural heritage when living and connecting with a land that is so vastly removed?


I can make up new stuff on my own, I know, but there is something about working with legends and myth that goes back thousands of years, that other people connect with and have connected with.

I sit here in this ghost town of a gold village and I spin yarn from wool straight off a sheep. I embroider artworks with needle and cloth. I light my fire and sit by it’s warmth. These things were done by women in this spot since the 1850s. These slow ways of being, of creating, of living are something that connects me to the history of this place but I want to create art based on the spirits of this place, on the mix of landscape and imagination that brings the place to life.


Water here is precious. Sun is plentiful and in summer it is dangerous. Summer is not the warm, pleasant, plentiful time of joy that it often is in England where I was born. Winter isn’t ice and snow and a baron land.
This village, at 850m above sea level and the other side of the Great Dividing Range from the coast is the closest I come to the weather and plant life I was born in to in Easbourne, Sussex, England.

We have milder summers and much colder winters than the coast. We have lots of European trees planted in the village. We actually get a proper Autumn here where all the leaves change.

Autum in Hill End

Within a short walking distance though it’s back to Gum trees and Wattle, which I love, but it is green all year round, or at least our version of green witch is really fairly grey. Summer is drought and heat and storms. It’s fire and floods and sun that burns everything brown and grey and brittle. It’s full of flies and mosquitoes, snakes and spiders. It’s certainly not a green and plentiful time.


We get a few days a year of 40c. Much less than we did on the coast but still awful. We get some winter nights at -6c. Much colder than the coast but we’ve only had one decent snow fall where it stuck. And even that was gone by morning.

snow in Hill End

We get less water and more floods. This land is a harsh and dangerous paradise. It’s hard work and red dust and wide open spaces. It’s coal and steel and gold. It’s sheep and cattle and kangaroos that well outnumber the people. It is beautiful and harsh and so very, very old but at the same time it’s brand new.

High Water in the Turon

Road to town

I want to make art to reflect that, to connect to this land that lives and breaths with me. To show others the savage beauty and the things you can’t always see. The things that were and the things that weren’t and the things that are.


I have been considering paintings that show European myths and legends in an Australian landscape and how out of place they look.
I want to go and sit out in the bush and take photos and draw the things I don’t see. I want to needle felt creatures that fit within our landscape but don’t exist and the ones that do.
In a less literal sense I want to spin wool dyed with the plants and ochres of where I live.

Now to find the time, space and money to make a start on this. Not sure I have enough of any of those to get much done any time soon though. I have only the space of my arm chair and the small amount of time when my health lets me think and do at the same time. Money is even more scarce at the moment.

2013 Heritage Wool and Natural Fibre Muster Part 2

Part one can be found here


Such pretty yarn

Felted fire

Felts and dyes




Gorgeous fibre

Cute placemat



These were all fantastic. Ruth ended up buying one

So much pretty


So many things we wanted but couldn’t afford


We left the Arts Centre and walked over to the Court House where the rest of the stalls were.

Outside the Court House

I ended up spending ages feeling these Artisan Lace yarns. So soft and amazing colours. I wanted to use them for embroidery. I ended up narrowing it down to the purple and the peacock green/blue. I went away for a while to look at other stuff as I’d just bought some Woolganic from them but ended up coming back and grabbing the green/blue one. It’s stunning. Not sure what exactly I’ll embroider yet but I think it will be on the back of a black hoodie.


This stall had the most amazing felted alpaca hats. I fell in love with the grey one. The prices were good but I just couldn’t afford it.

Here it is. Isn’t it pretty. I also love the little alpacas


And here is our spoils. From top left we have a new cable for Ruth’s interchangeable set as the old one broke. A gorgeous yarn by””, 8 balls of Woolganic wool. It’s so soft and pretty.
Second Row: The peacock blue lace weight yarn, a bag of white corn silk fibre, a lovely nostepinne that looks like a beater’s bat from Harry Potter.
Bottom row: black, purple and white Merino/Silk fibre, a bunch of business cards and some needle felting needles.

I did enjoy the show a lot and will try and get there again soon. I ended up with my health crashing badly after walking around for so long. Still managed to get to Orange and get some shopping done.

2013 Heritage Wool and Natural Fibre Muster Part 1


Last Saturday we went to the Heritage Wool and Natural Fibre Muster in Carcoar.


We turned up later than we hoped. Managed to drop in to the Bathurst Co-Op for veg and The Wholefood Kitchen for fantastic coffee and some delicious lemon and coconut cake on the way.

They had two gorgeous Alpacas out the front in a pen. Adorable things they are. The bigger one kept stopping the other one from getting to the food bucket.
Bumble Hill Alpacas


These are the gorgeous prizes for the raffle. The jumper on the left was so soft, knit in a fine alpaca yarn. Sadly we did not win. Would have loved that. The first prize is a beautiful woven throw rug and third prize was a cowl made with hand spun, died and knitted alpaca yarn. The proceeds of the raffle are going to aid the spinners in the Christchurch area.


I’m afraid I’m not going to be able to put names to most of the stalls. It was packed and I was in a lot of pain. I grabbed a whole heap of cards but I really can’t remember which one went with which stall. 
This one I do know though. This is Casbar. Their farm is just outside Hill End, we’re practically neighbours. 
There was a gorgeous grey fleece that I would have loved to buy but it was out of my price range. 
There was also some soft, soft alpaca, some beautiful spun wool and lovely jumpers, hats and scarves.


Casbar’s gorgeous scarves and a jumper


Gorgeous hand painted yarn



Denise Lithgow Designs


Smooshy skeins, jumpers and hats


Pinwheel jacket and lovely pastel yarns


Dyed locks




Orange lace


The bobbin lace demonstrations were fascinating.


We ended up in a photo in the Blaney Chronical. We’re in the third photo along watching 10yr old Anna demonstrate bobbin lace making.


There was a competition through the local spinning and craft groups. The theme this year was bags.

 It was a great day out with loads of smooshy yarn and fibre to feel.

It’s great to get to see stuff in person, see what it looks like in natural light, feel what it’s like, how stretchy or bouncy it is. Without Internet shopping we’d be terribly limited in yarn choice but it’s so hard to know what stuff is worth buying.

We will definitely try and get to the muster again next year.
I have way too many photos for just one post so look out for part two soon.

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