wallflowerarts

Adding Gold to Our Rainbow

Archive for the category “knitting”

We need help getting to a health conference so we are having a sale.

Photos are of things we have made. They are not all for sale in our Etsy shop but something similar can be commissioned from us. Scroll down for a coupon code to get 5% of everything in our Etsy Shop

(me out with the dogs on one of my better days)

My health has always been bad but these days I really am struggling to keep functioning.
Many years ago I was diagnosed with Fibromyalgia and Chronic Fatigue Syndrome. I deal with pain every day. Sometimes it is much worse than others. Changing air pressure causes a really bad day. Some days I have enough energy to make food and work on art and craft stuff and catch up with friends and family online, some days I can barely make it out of bed and moving to the toilet and back is really difficult. These conditions are managed as much as I can. It became obvious though that they were not my only problems.

(Handspun merino/silk blend yarn in blues)

This last year I was diagnosed with Ehlers–Danlos Syndrome. It is a connective tissue disorder, it affects collagen proteins in the body. Collagen is a building block that strengthens and supports various body tissues. It is found in tendons, ligaments, cartilage, skin, bone, blood vessels, the gut and the spine.
EDS is caused by alterations in certain genes, which make collagen weaker. Sometimes the amount of collagen in the body is reduced. The faulty genes can be passed from parents to their children.
Wiki’s page on EDSIn depth article on hypermobility type EDS

(needle felted pod baby)

I have frequent dislocations and sublaxes, usually fingers and toes and my jaw but also small bones in my feet, my left shoulder and my ankles. This causes a great amount of pain and instability. My muscles and tendons are over worked trying to stabilize joints and reduce movement. I have a herniated disc in both my neck and my lower spine, trapping nerves because my spine also moves too far and I have carpel tunnel in my wrists.
I have chronic migraines (many times a week) because the blood vessels in my brain expand to easily because of the collagen problem.
My skin is fairly fragile and my scalp will tear if I just rub at my head. My other biggest problem at the moment, with all the stupid heat, is Orthostatic Intolerance. My blood pressure drops causing me to faint when I stand for more than a minute and in hot weather it drops even when I’m sitting up. I also have huge troubles controlling my body temperature. If it is hot I get hotter and hotter until I throw up if I can’t cool myself down with an ice pack or cold shower. It makes these nearly 40c days unbearable.

(Teeny sheep earrings)

My doctor and physiotherapist are trying to help but neither of them knows much about EDS. I go to hydrotherapy once a week and am getting splints made for my wrists to help with the carpel tunnel. For the rest, right now, I just deal with best I can.

(Hand knit purple cable hoodie for a child)

This July there is a conference on in Parramatta focusing on EDS and Connective Tissue Disorders.
http://www.edsconference.com.au/2014/index.php
This is a massive chance for me to find out other ways I can cope with the symptoms and find medical practitioners who can help. This is one of the only chances I will have to access all this information in one place.

(hand knit toy elephant)

I live about 7 hours drive from Sydney but have family I can stay with about an hour away. I can save up for the dog boarding we’ll need to get there but registration for the conference is open now and is limited to 300 places. For Ruth and I to go to the conference on Saturday and Sunday it will cost $316. We just don’t have this right now at all but I do not want to miss this chance.

(Hobbit hole from the tiny house embroidery series)

I know money is tight right now for everyone but if you can have a look at our Etsy Store and see if there is anything you need or want.
From now until the 1st March you can use the code EDSSALE receive 5% off everything in our shop.

We also take commissions for art, knitting, crochet, hand spun yarn, needle felted creations or anything else that we’ve done before. You can find more information about commissioning us at our Commission Page or Email me at wallflowerarts@gmail.com.
If you can’t afford to buy anything then if you could share this post with others who might like our stuff that would be fantastic.

(embroidered hoodie)

You can also find us at FacebookTwitter and Instagram follow us there to keep up to date with stuff we make.

(all 7 of the Creature Art Cards but number 7 is not finished here)
(Crochet Prince Arthur from BBC’s Merlin)

(hand knit Dalek)

(hand knit large ball)

(needle felted art dolls Steampunk)

(embroidered Ron Weasley)

(hand spun 2ply yarn in magenta and blues)

(hand knit child’s cabled jumper)

(hand knit hat)

(hand knit fingerless mitts)

(needle felted polar bear)

(Embroidered winter tree)



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Knitted things

A big welcome to those who ventured over here from the link in the Hill End Gathering Group newsletter.
Most of these knitted items are going up in our Etsy shop if you would rather buy through there. Otherwise you can comment here (if you can manage Bloggers CAPTCHA settings) or email me at wallflowerarts@gmail.com.
You can also find us at Facebook, Twitter and Instagram

Are you cold? Or want to stock up for when it’s cold? Or buy things for people who live where it gets cold? Here are some knitted things. Most will eventually go up on Etsy but if you want to save me the effort and fees you can get it cheaper at market price.

All of these are 100% wool except two of the shawls and a scarf. Most are hand wash only. If you want one of these but in a different colour or different material, or a pair of mitts that are shorter or longer we can do that too. Just ask.

Can’t afford or aren’t interested in buying knitted things? You can still look at the awesome stuff we’ve made.

We also take commissions for anything knitted, crochet, needle felted or embroidered and I’ll do art commissions.

We have other hats (a few more kids ones etc) and embroideries and some needle felting at our Etsy Shop

Hats

* Lumikukka pattern by Marja Airaksinen. Knit in cream (Aran) Rustic wool from Bendigo Woollen Mills $40. Adult size.
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* Aeonium pattern by Woollywormhead. Knit in cream (Aran) Rustic wool from Bendigo Woollen Mills $40. Adult size.
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* Welldigger pattern by Polly Hammond. Knit in grey Rustic wool from Bendigo Woollen Mills $25. Adult size. This is knit in   stitch and is really squishy and thick. The rolled brim allows you to pull it down deeper on your head if you want. It covers my ears. We’re hoping to sort out a pair of mitts to match, using the same stitch. It’s grey, not blue. The colour is like the first two photos.
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* Brambles pattern by Amanda Muscha. Knit in yellow Rustic wool from Bendigo Woollen Mills. It’s a pale yellow but more yellow than this is showing on my monitor. I’ll try and get a better shot. $30. Adult size. This is a slightly slouchy beanie. If you wanted it could be blocked as a beret or left as a beanie. (The ravelry link shows it as a beret) The bottom picture is just me trying to show the top while holding the hat and the camera. On your head it wouldn’t scrunch up so much.
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* The bubble hat pattern by . Knit in cream Rustic wool from Bendigo Woollen Mills $25 . Adult size. Fold the brim or pull it down depending on how deep you like your beanies.
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* Corby pattern by Woollywormhead. Knit in cream, blue, black, purple and yellow Rustic wool from Bendigo Woollen Mills $35. Adult size.
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* Weekender pattern by Woollywormhead. Knit in blue Rustic wool from Bendigo Woollen Mills $40. Adult size.
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* The long beanie pattern by Woollywormhead. Knit in red, blue and charcoal Rustic wool from Bendigo Woollen Mills $25. Adult size.
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Mitts

* Strong Heart pattern by Wei S. Leong. Knit in red tweed (blue, purple, red mix) More the colour of the second picture. Rustic wool from Bendigo Woollen Mills $40. Adult female size with a fair bit of stretch. These are really long in both the arm and the hand and use a lot of wool, hence the price. If you wanted a pair with the same pattern but shorter, we can do that too.
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* Alderman pattern by Victoria Magnus. Knit in aqua Rustic wool from Bendigo Woollen Mills $30. Adult female size. These don’t have as much stretch but should still fit most hands. These are shorter but quite thick.
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* Cold Turkey pattern by Veronica O’Neil. Knit in aqua Rustic wool from Bendigo Woollen Mills $30. Adult size. These are really flexible. I have tiny wrists and big forearms and these fit but Ruth doesn’t have either of those and they fit her too.
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* Annabella pattern by Anna Aponte. Knit in grey Rustic wool from Bendigo Woollen Mills $40. Adult size. These are fairly flexible due to the ribbing on the underside. I love the pattern. If you have really skinny forearms you may need a different size but this should fit most sizes. These can also be knit shorter.
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Scarves

* Branching Out pattern by Susan Lawrence. Knit in green Rustic wool from Bendigo Woollen Mills $40. This is a short scarf/cowl. Long enough to fit round your neck and tie in a knot or be pinned but wont hang down far. It’s about 40 inches long an 14 wide.
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* Sparkle and rose pattern by Me. Knit in sparkly soft black acrylic with needle felted wool roses. It really doesn’t photograph well but it has a subtle silver sparkle through it. $35. Long and flexible enough to be tied anyway you like. It’s light and lacy with ruffles on the ends. One side has a needle felted wool rose. I can make more of these but the rose is going to be different each time as it’s freehand. I also have another of the scarves without the roses for $15. It’s around 60 inches long but it depends on how wide you pull it.
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Shawls

* The common bean pattern by Caitlin Ffrench. Knit in blue (Delta) Rustic wool from Bendigo Woollen Mills $45. Adult size short shawllete.
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* Miami Vice pattern by threebagsfulled. Knit in bright rainbow acrylic yarn $50. Adult size. Comes down to just below your shoulder blades at the back. I can get photos.
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* Age of Brass and Steam pattern by Orange Flower Yarn . Knit in  coppers and browns acrylic yarn $40. Adult size kerchief. Needs blocking or ironing to stop the bottom edge curling. We will do this. The colours on this are hard to photograph. It’s very Autumn colours.
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* Robin pattern by Lee Meredith. Knit in light blue, green, red, yellow and purple Rustic wool from Bendigo Woollen Mills $180. Massive. This is an asymetrical garter stitch shawl. We will block it to even out the decreases etc but it wont get a lot bigger (as lace does when it’s blocked). This is quite a lot of wool, hence the price. It’s a warm and practical garment though. It wont catch like delicate lace shawls do. You can secure it with a shawl pin or a bobby pin.
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Shawl

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Ruth had picked up this gorgeous 2ply colour-way at Spotlight and decided she wanted to knit a shawl with it.

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It’s mostly acrylic but has some wool content.

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It’s not been blocked yet, which should open up the lace.  The pattern is the Aeolian Shawl from Knitty

work in progress shots

We’ve been busy working on a few projects of late. I’ll have more photos once these are finished and have been given to their new owners.
Here’s a sneak peak

Green tweed panel

Blue cable

What are you working on?

2013 Heritage Wool and Natural Fibre Muster Part 2

Part one can be found here

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Such pretty yarn

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Felted fire

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Felts and dyes

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Gorgeous fibre

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Cute placemat

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These were all fantastic. Ruth ended up buying one

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So much pretty

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So many things we wanted but couldn’t afford

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We left the Arts Centre and walked over to the Court House where the rest of the stalls were.

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Outside the Court House

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I ended up spending ages feeling these Artisan Lace yarns. So soft and amazing colours. I wanted to use them for embroidery. I ended up narrowing it down to the purple and the peacock green/blue. I went away for a while to look at other stuff as I’d just bought some Woolganic from them but ended up coming back and grabbing the green/blue one. It’s stunning. Not sure what exactly I’ll embroider yet but I think it will be on the back of a black hoodie.

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This stall had the most amazing felted alpaca hats. I fell in love with the grey one. The prices were good but I just couldn’t afford it.

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Here it is. Isn’t it pretty. I also love the little alpacas

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And here is our spoils. From top left we have a new cable for Ruth’s interchangeable set as the old one broke. A gorgeous yarn by””, 8 balls of Woolganic wool. It’s so soft and pretty.
Second Row: The peacock blue lace weight yarn, a bag of white corn silk fibre, a lovely nostepinne that looks like a beater’s bat from Harry Potter.
Bottom row: black, purple and white Merino/Silk fibre, a bunch of business cards and some needle felting needles.

I did enjoy the show a lot and will try and get there again soon. I ended up with my health crashing badly after walking around for so long. Still managed to get to Orange and get some shopping done.

2013 Heritage Wool and Natural Fibre Muster Part 1

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Last Saturday we went to the Heritage Wool and Natural Fibre Muster in Carcoar.

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We turned up later than we hoped. Managed to drop in to the Bathurst Co-Op for veg and The Wholefood Kitchen for fantastic coffee and some delicious lemon and coconut cake on the way.

They had two gorgeous Alpacas out the front in a pen. Adorable things they are. The bigger one kept stopping the other one from getting to the food bucket.
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Bumble Hill Alpacas

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These are the gorgeous prizes for the raffle. The jumper on the left was so soft, knit in a fine alpaca yarn. Sadly we did not win. Would have loved that. The first prize is a beautiful woven throw rug and third prize was a cowl made with hand spun, died and knitted alpaca yarn. The proceeds of the raffle are going to aid the spinners in the Christchurch area.

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I’m afraid I’m not going to be able to put names to most of the stalls. It was packed and I was in a lot of pain. I grabbed a whole heap of cards but I really can’t remember which one went with which stall. 
This one I do know though. This is Casbar. Their farm is just outside Hill End, we’re practically neighbours. 
There was a gorgeous grey fleece that I would have loved to buy but it was out of my price range. 
There was also some soft, soft alpaca, some beautiful spun wool and lovely jumpers, hats and scarves.

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Casbar’s gorgeous scarves and a jumper

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Gorgeous hand painted yarn

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Denise Lithgow Designs

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Smooshy skeins, jumpers and hats

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Pinwheel jacket and lovely pastel yarns

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Dyed locks

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Orange lace

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The bobbin lace demonstrations were fascinating.

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We ended up in a photo in the Blaney Chronical. We’re in the third photo along watching 10yr old Anna demonstrate bobbin lace making.

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There was a competition through the local spinning and craft groups. The theme this year was bags.

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 It was a great day out with loads of smooshy yarn and fibre to feel.

It’s great to get to see stuff in person, see what it looks like in natural light, feel what it’s like, how stretchy or bouncy it is. Without Internet shopping we’d be terribly limited in yarn choice but it’s so hard to know what stuff is worth buying.

We will definitely try and get to the muster again next year.
I have way too many photos for just one post so look out for part two soon.

Finished Projects: Part Two, the knitted hoodie commission

Photo of Ruth wearing a knitted jumper with a hood in a grey/brown colour, taken from the side with the hood down
Our other big project since the Hill End Market was our knitted hoodie commission.

While waiting for our steak sandwich and chips at Kepple Street Fish Shop, Ruth was knitting (as always), and ended up in a conversation with Georgie about it that finished with Georgie commissioning a hooded jumper for her son. Kepple St Fish Shop has fantastic take away food by the way. Many gluten free options available and I’ve never got sick eating from there (I have Coeliac’s and the tiniest amount of cross contaminated gluten and I get really sick).

She mentioned wanting it big and baggy but at first we didn’t realise she wanted it for her son rather than herself. We showed her a couple of designs but she just wanted a plain jumper with a kangaroo pocket on the front and a hood.

Photo of Ruth wearing the knitted jumper, taken front on with the hood up. You can see the kangaroo pocket on the front

Ruth ended up mashing together about 3 patterns and made some stuff up as she went. I tacked on the sleeves once they were knit up and we found that they were ridiculously long. Not sure how that happened as she was mostly working from the Central Park Hoodie pattern for the sleeves, just leaving off the cables. I can see how that could mean that the sleeves would be too wide but too long? We weren’t happy with the shape at the top of the sleeves either. I couldn’t get it to attach neatly. Ruth ripped back to the start of the decreases and we decided to just decrease on every row. It worked great.

Photo of Ruth wearing the knitted jumper. Taken from behind with the hood up
The funny lump there in the hood is just because Ruth had her hair bunned up.

I tacked it all together again and we took it in to Bathurst so we could check the size. This was when we found out that it wasn’t for Georgie but for her son. Who is very tall. The shoulders and arms fitted perfectly though so that was good.

We took it home, I undid all the seems and Ruth ripped the body pieces back to just before the decreases for the sleeves, added another 6 inches and then did the decreases.

I sewed it all together properly this time and wove all the ends in. Boy it is heavy and my shoulders are dodgy. It was knit with two strands of 8ply (DK weight) Luxury from Bendigo Woolen Mills in Cork Brown. 100% Wool and incredibly warm. Should be fantastic this winter. It regularly gets down to -6c at night here in Hill End. I don’t think it gets quite that cold in Bathurst but they’ll certainly have more use for such a warm jumper there than you would in Sydney.

Ruth wearing the knitted jumper taken from side on with the hood up

With the extra 6 inches it fit really well. Unfortunately I don’t have a photo of it on the person it was made for. As usual these photos were taken just before we drove in to Bathurst to deliver the jumper. As an amateur photographer I’m never happy with the rushed photos. I really should factor in more time to take some decent product photos before sending things off.

If you’re interested in commissioning a knitted jumper or jacket email us at wallflowerarts@gmail.com about pricing. Because of the weight the postage would be a fair bit so if you’re not in Australia and you’re not prepared to pay quite a lot on postage you might be better off finding someone local.

Getting back in to things

Well that didn’t go so well.
I meant to keep writing but I got rather sick again over Christmas. I have a few different chronic health conditions that all flare up if I do too much and we had two trips away in December to visit family. Loads of driving, looking after our nephew and just catching up with people and I spent most of January unable to do much of anything.

Then we went to Sydney again to visit a friend who was over from the US and went to the zoo. It was great to see our friends and the animals but it was pouring with rain (it was actually flooded in lots of places, like up over my ankles, thankfully I had my new shoes. The old ones would have fallen apart) and the zoo is massive. So much walking caused all sorts of problems and I’m only just getting back to functioning.

This weekend is the Hill End market so we’ve been making stuff for that. We have a stall there Saturday and Sunday from 10am to 3pm.
I’ll write another post about that though.

We had a big day in Orange yesterday. We picked up a fruit box from The Farm Gate. Fantastic fruit straight from the orchard. We also managed to get the other stuff we needed done but something made me sick. I only had a juice and a coffee but I got a severe gluten reaction just after drinking the coffee so I’m guessing there was some cross contamination somewhere. After all that we didn’t get home until gone 11:30pm.

This morning we set up the stall at the hall. Just need to finish pricing the adult hats and take them with us tomorrow morning when the market opens.

I’ve managed to lose my card reader so I can’t get photos off my dSLR camera right now. I’m trying to make do with the phone camera but it’s really not the same.

Knitting Alan Dart’s Nativity Collection Part 1

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This is going to be knit as an ongoing Christmas present for Nephew (soon to be Nephews). We plan on doing 3 figures a year. First year was a bit of a cheat because one of the figures was Jesus.

Sorry for the lack of decent pictures. It was finished, I took the photos at night and wrapped them up to be posted to Sydney the day before Christmas Eve. Was so pleased they got there in time.

Nativities are not our thing but it seems to go down pretty well with family and means we don’t have to struggle to find a present each year.

The pattern is the Alan Dart Nativity Collection published in Sirdar 285. Alan Dart has three Nativity patterns. Nativity Set, Christmas Wishes Nativity and the Nativity Collection. We chose the Nativity Collection because it is bigger and much more detailed.
Here is our Project page on Ravelry http://ravel.me/dindalay/tnc2
 
These are all being knit in acrylic and we are avoiding the cardboard because Nephew was 18 months when the first figures arrived and new nephew will be born by the second Christmas so we wanted figures you could chuck in the washing machine if you needed too and ones that didn’t have anything sharp in them.

Ruth has knitted all the pieces and I’ve been sewing them up. As is usual for Alan Dart stuff they look great but the making up instructions are useless and I basically have to make it up myself from looking at the picture.

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Ruth thought about knitting it all in the round to stop so many of the pieces but I decided it was better to do it in pieces so I have more control over how it is stuffed and can make the changes I need to to make it work.

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We decided to knit just Mary, Joseph and baby Jesus this year as we started really late but we also liked the idea of the nativity growing each year. When we’ve finished we may even start on the Noah’s Ark. If we’re crazy enough by then.

The pattern knits up okay. It’s a bit fiddly and there are lots of pieces but it’s not massively difficult. It’s once you try and follow the making up instructions that I had trouble.

It wasn’t quite as hard to follow as the Thomas The Tank Engine making up instructions but when I followed the instructions my figures didn’t look anything like the ones in the pictures. The heads sagged, their faces were covered by the headscarves, they wouldn’t stand and they just looked really sad.

There is no way a thin strip of knitting was going to hold up the head.
And even if you did put the cardboard in the bottom of the gown, once you add feet to the front of that how does the figure stand?

I took all the pieces apart again and just made up my own way of putting them together. Unfortunately I’m writing this a year later so I’m not sure I can remember everything but I’ve just put together one of the Shepherds and it’s mostly the same technique.

First up I stuffed the gown. I felted some of the polyfill stuffing together into a disk shape for the bottom edge as I didn’t want to use cardboard. It made it a bit more stable. I just rubbed it together in my hands. Using the felting needle was just too time consuming for this but you could get a much firmer felt with it. I was just on a time limit.

Then I tacked the arms on with spare yarn so I could make sure they were in the right place. So many times I’ve sewn limbs on and then found they are in the wrong place. I wanted to make sure that the seam of the gown was at the back. This wouldn’t be an issue if you knit the gown in the round.

I put the head on after the arms as it’s easier to get it to line up. To get the neck to stay upright I had to change the way I sewed it on. I didn’t want to use a toothpick or pipe cleaner as I wanted to make these safe for babies.

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(Excuse the dodgy drawings. I’ll update these once I’m well enough to sit at the computer)

I sewed the neck piece to the head and then sat that almost totally inside the neck hole of the gown.
I threaded a piece of yarn the same colour as the gown around the neck hole in the gown and pulled it tight around the neck piece. I then used yarn the same colour as the skin to make sure the neck was sewn to the gown well and threaded it up to the had and back down all the way around the neck. This makes it thicker and stronger. You could also use thicker yarn for the neck

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I think all the figures have beard/headscarf/tabard thing to cover the neck except Mary and she has that collar thing too so you don’t really see it.

Make sure with Mary you put the collar thing on before sewing the neck into the body piece though.

 I had to add way more hair for it to show up under Mary’s headscarf and I decided it looked better down in a ponytail at the back rather than tied in a bun where you couldn’t see it and it just made the headscarf bump out oddly.

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As a lot of people have said, the headscarves are usually too big. I ended up tacking them on in places to make them sit right. I also threaded more yarn of the same colour around the bottom edges of the headscarves to try and get them to stay flatter.
I think in the end just tacking it to the body at the bottom and around the shoulder area on both sides was more successful.

I didn’t embroider the eyes until I had the headscarf stitched in place and the nose sewn on. I then just did them where they looked good rather than counting the stitches because the headscarf took up much more space that it should.

Ruth used the same normal yarn for the beards as we didn’t haven anything fuzzy. They came out pretty massive and I had to thread more yarn through the edges and pull it tight to get a better size to fit on the faces.

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After about three goes at Mary’s eyebrows making her look odd or like a man I ended up doing three small stitches in a curved arc rather than the straight stitch. Women have more curved eyebrows. It really made the difference. I also gave up on trying to give her a mouth. She looked better on mine without one.

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The feet I also stuffed with semi felted stuffing. I still had to sew them on many times before I could get the figures to even stand up some of the time.
I can see why people added something at the back to make these stand up right. Once you sew the feet on to the front they rock back and tend to fall over.
I sewed them as far apart as I could and with very little sticking out the front of the figures. They stood up okay.

(This year when making the next figures I used some foamboard to cut out the circle at the bottom and the feet pieces in the pattern. This has made them a little more stable but they still aren’t as upright as I’d like. If you weren’t making them to be put through a washing machine then beans or rice would help a lot to stand them up. I think you could also easily leave the feet off.)

Once I’d finished putting Mary and Joseph together I
decided that they were too plain. I know that Mary and Joseph were meant to be poor but if you make your own clothes you can embroider them cheaply to make them look better.

I chain stitched in yellow around the edge of Mary’s headscarf with some straight stitch details on the front and and a flower in straight stitch on the back.
I just did running stitch around the edge of Joseph’s headscarf.

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I couldn’t do the twisted cord for the belts and around the headscarves so I used what I’ve always known as fingerknitting. It’s basically like chain stitching in crochet but you pull it tight after each stitch and I do it with my fingers. I’m sure it has a proper name somewhere.

I then unspun the ends of the cords once knotted on Joseph and as I wanted it a bit neater on Mary I knotted it up and I think I used the felting needle to make sure it all tucked in there.

I will write up about the next lot of figures once Christmas is over because family wants them to be a surprise. I’m taking more photos this time. We started much earlier.

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Brain Fog and knitting

One of the worst symptoms of my collection of health problems, other than pain, is the brain fog.
It often makes it hard to carry on a conversation, I have massive gaps in my memory of times when I was in a flare, I get lost in my 4 room house (can’t remember which door takes me where) and things like that. It’s incredibly frustrating and sometimes a little frightening.

Yesterday we had appointments at the doctor’s and a bunch of other things to do. I had a big day. There’s the three hours driving and I did some walking around shops and had to try on some clothes. We ended up having to go and sit in McDonald’s for a while while I took pain killers, ate some food and drink and rested. I was to exhausted and in pain to even attempt the drive home. It’s not an easy road. I haven’t been that bad in a long time.

Anyway I recovered enough to drive home and, after shutting off for a while and watching QI, I downloaded the first installment of Woollywormhead’s Mystery Hat Knit-A-Long. I read the instructions, found the needles, Ruth showed me how to do a provisional cast on and off I went with knitting.
It wasn’t until this evening, after knitting a few inches, that I checked the Ravelry board for it and realised that I’d been knitting it flat when it had said to knit it in the round. I had been slightly confused by some of the later instructions but I’d just decided to look at that further when I’d got up to it.

Thankfully I had only done a few inches rather than the whole 21. It’s one of the more harmless confusions so it doesn’t bother me too much and I guess it’s something that’s easy to do even if you’re not ill. Wish I’d checked it this morning before carrying on with the knitting though.

I’ve now started again and hopefully things will go smoother from this point. I will be double and triple checking instructions anyway. Maybe I should get Ruth to check them for me too.

The pattern calls for 5ply, which I didn’t have and 3.5mm needles, which I also didn’t have as Ruth was using them but I knitted a swatch and found that my 4ply yarn (Bendigo Woolen Mill’s 4ply Luxury 100% wool in the Brick colourway) and 3.25 needles were getting me gauge so I shall see how I go. Wish me luck.

Here are some general knitting photos. None of the actual project as it’s a mystery.
Chemical Love in progress

Paw Tracks sock in Jitterbug

Cotton bear

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